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What Decriminalization? :: Drogas México


What Decriminalization?


If anything, the new law criminalizes drug use much more radically than before The recently approved new “drug” law in Mexico is in fact not a step toward decriminalization, but rather toward mandatory sentencing. Until last month, possession of small (unspecified) amounts of drugs was not a criminal offense in Mexico; only the sale or purchase was. The...
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What Decriminalization?

Jorge Castañeda Gutman

13 de septiembre de 2009 (14/09/09)
ver en roomfordebate.blogs.nytimes.com

If anything, the new law criminalizes drug use much more radically than before



The recently approved new “drug” law in Mexico is in fact not a step toward decriminalization, but rather toward mandatory sentencing. Until last month, possession of small (unspecified) amounts of drugs was not a criminal offense in Mexico; only the sale or purchase was. The new law establishes a minuscule limit on legal possession, meaning that today, almost anyone caught carrying any drug is subject to arrest, prosecution and jail.

If anything, the new law criminalizes drug use much more radically than before, and it is probably for this reason that President Calderón signed it, and that the Obama administration has looked the other way. It will almost certainly not attract US “drug tourists” to Mexico, since the risk of being arrested for possession has grown considerably with the new law, whereas before the real risk was just a shakedown by the authorities.

The law actually is part of a campaign to justify President Calderón’s war of choice on drugs by stating that drug consumption in Mexico has increased over the past 10 years. In fact, the government’s own unpublished but leaked National Addiction Survey for 2008 shows that this is not the case. The growth of marijuana, heroin and metaphetamine consumption is flat in all categories (addiction, occasional use, at-least-once-in-a-lifetime use), and while cocaine addiction, for example, did rise from 300 000 victims in 2002 to 450 000 in 2008 (a 50 percent increase, or roughly 6 percent per year), it did so from a tiny baseline, for a tiny percentage (0.4 percent) of Mexico’s population, a much smaller share than for the U.S., Western Europe and practically every country in Latin America.

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ver en roomfordebate.blogs.nytimes.com


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Angles :
Los consumidores de drogas son víctimas de la prohibición. La prohibición soporta las altas ganancias de los grupos de traficantes que, en el caso mexicano cuando menos, se encuentran históricamente coludidos con los políticos, no con los consumidores como señala la Drug Free A F. Lo que sí, es que las altas ganancias de las drogas ilícitas parecen lubricar la complicidad con ciertos políticos -que mantienen vigente el discurso de la prohibición-, círculo virtuoso desde el punto de vista de los beneficiados. En ese sentido, es importante el dato del bajo número de consumidores de respecto a otros países, pues es otro indicador de lo desproporcionado de "la guerra contra las drogas" considerando que resumen sus razones en el slogan "para que las drogas no lleguen a tus hijos"; todo señala que la política de guerra tiene un trasfondo distinto al beneficio social.
15/09/2009 | 16:29
en What Decriminalization?
   
ricardelico :
Calvina Fay, de Drug Free America Foundation: "Drug users are not innocent. They support the vicious drug cartels. Without their demand for drugs, the supply side has no purpose. Since terrorists depend on the drug market to fund their activities, users are potentially aiding terrorism. Because drug traffickers are frequently linked with weapons and human trafficking, users are also supporting these activities." Caray, es como decir que el consumo de cualquier producto ilegal es ilegal y por lo tanto no inocente! Qué clase de argumento es éste.
14/09/2009 | 13:28
en What Decriminalization?
   
ricardelico :
Recomiendo accedan al link del NYT:<br> Mexico last month adopted a law that decriminalizes the possession of small amounts of marijuana and harder drugs, including cocaine and heroin. Other countries in Latin America are considering similar changes in their laws, prompting antidrug groups in the U.S. to say that pressure from south of the border will push the United States toward decriminalization, if not legalization, of drugs.<br> What effect will the new policy will have in Mexico and, possibly, in the United States? Will it draw so-called drug tourists from across the border? Is the Obama administration doing the right thing by taking a wait-and-see attitude, in contrast to the Bush administration’s vehement opposition to a similar plan proposed in Mexico in 2006?<br> * Tony Payan, political scientist<br> * Jorge Castañeda, former foreign minister of Mexico<br> * Calvina Fay, Drug Free America Foundation Inc.<br> * Peter Reuter, professor of criminology<br> * Ethan Nadelmann, Drug Policy Alliance<br> Related<br> * Room for Debate: If Marijuana Is Legal, Will Addiction Rise?<br>
14/09/2009 | 12:58
en What Decriminalization?
   
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